Saturday, 31 October 2015

Winds Of Time

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In the scheme of things mankind has not been on earth very long and no matter what we achieve in the future the probability is that in a geological timescale we are likely to be a mere blip in the history of this planet. That said the lifespan of Earth itself pales into insignificance in grand scheme.

This got me thinking and a the following poem breezed into mind.

Winds Of Time

The Fulani knew my power
as hunched against my breath
they drove herds in search of pasture
that I’d not smothered yet.
You call me Harmattan,
though that is not my name,
for I was here before you
before the desert came
and when your bones are naught but dust
I will still remain.

The Clatsop knew my warmth
as I swept the mountain slopes
I melted snow before me
and bought false signs of hope.
You call me Chinook
though that is not my name
for my clouds enriched sunrise
before the dawn of man
and they’ll brighten western skies
when your last race has run.

Columbus and Magellan
thought they'd harnessed me
as they navigated oceans
in search of destiny.
You call me Trade Winds
but that is not my name
for I blew before the ocean's birth
when a mighty rupture came
and I'll be blowing still
when land joins land again.

I helped shape mountains,
I swept the plains between.
From ice cap to desert
I sculpted the terrain.
I breathed, before life,
before little pools of green,
before cells came together
to crawl out from the sea
and I was here a long, long time,
before apes climbed in the trees.

Yet even I will perish
as time alone survives,
for this planet will crumble
scattered amidst the skies
it's atmosphere burnt off
carried on cosmic winds.
Our atoms will float
through a universe sublime
waiting to be born again
in the ebb and flow of time

John Carré Buchanan
31 October 2015


With thanks to Richard Fleming for his help.

This poem is linked to the midweek motif on Poets United.

28 comments:

  1. A really 'big' poem in every sense. One of your best, John, and the accompanying image is perfect.

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    1. Thank you Richard, both for your help and your kind comment.

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  2. Hello John, Winds Of Time, excellent and for me thought provoking. A poem I would return to.

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    1. Julian, Thank you very much for your kind comment. I am glad you enjoyed the poem.

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  3. What a wonderful pontification of time. It made me think of excavations of past cities, treasures on the ocean floor, and civilizations of eons ago. What a great poem!

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    1. Hi Indybev, Thank you for your kind comment, I'm glad you enjoyed the poem.

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    1. Hi Susan, Thank you I am glad you liked it.

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  5. I like the hope in your closing lines, that in the everness of time, all will live again. Nice to meet you at Poets United!

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    1. Nice to meet you too Sherry Blue Sky, Thanks for your kind comment.

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  6. You have given time the voice it deserves. A stunning write John!!

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    1. Hi Carrie, thank you for your kind comment. I am glad you enjoyed it.

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  7. Now this is really a wonderful poem. I was totally enthralled by it.

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    1. Hi Old Egg, I am glad you felt that way, thank you for taking the time to leave such a nice comment.

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  8. An ode to the wind I enjoyed how cultures across time and space named it. A absolutely amazing poem with a message.

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    1. Hi Marja, I had had this poem in mind for quite a while and then it just came all in a rush. I'm glad you enjoyed it. Thanks for your kind comment.

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  9. There is an eeriness and aloness in the image of the cosmic winds whirling through space when the earth will die..It reinforces the fact that everything is finite.Interesting and thought provoking poem.

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    1. Hi Rallentanda, I take some comfort that whilst mankind seems intent on damaging the environment, the Great Barrier Reef is only 10,000 years old. this means that there is hope that the damage we do can be repaired with time. Thanks for your kind comment.

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  10. This is a powerful flow! I like the strength, acceptance and hope in the speaker. Nice to meet you here @ PU.

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    1. Thank you Sumana Roy, your kind comment is much appreciated, nice to meet you too.

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  11. Whew! This is truly epic. A masterpiece filled with depth and meaning!

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    1. Hi Mary, Thank you for your lovely comment. I am glad you liked the poem.

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  12. A thought provoking piece, John. Loved this poem immensely!!

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    1. Hi Panchali, Thank you I am glad that you liked it.

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  13. Stunning writing, John. I read it several times, thinking about its message.

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    1. Thank you Sara, I am glad you enjoyed reading it. Hopefully you will find some of my other poems as interesting. Thanks for taking the time to leave such a nice comment.

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    1. Hi Rosemary, Thank you for your kind comment, I am glad you thought so.

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I really appreciate constructive feedback. If you are able to comment it would be most grateful.